Memphis Council Candidate Questionnaire: District 6 Answers

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1. If elected or re-elected to the city council, will you propose programs and/or initiatives to limit the number of arrests for minor offenses in the city?

P. BOND: DID NOT RESPOND

T. BOND:

Yes

Yes, in Memphis we have a real crime problem and it’s important that we have viable solutions to combat such. In doing so, minor offenses such as possessing small amounts of marijuana should not result in arrest and subsequent jail time.

BROWN: DID NOT RESPOND

CLEMONS:

Yes

One of the major things I will push for is the discontinuance of giving citations for misdemeanor marijuana offenses. As a city, we are top heavy with misdemeanor citations related to marijuana possession and as such, I believe an initiative of this caliber could immensely drive down the likelihood of many people coming in contact with the criminal justice system. By freeing up police personnel from writing citations, we can focus our efforts on stoping or mediating violent crime incidents. Refocusing our efforts while also implementing programs that do away with unnecessary citations is a way to ensure that people don’t come in contact with the judiciary for minor offenses.

FORD: DID NOT RESPOND

HAMILTON:

Yes

Yes, I will propose expanding programs and/or initiatives to limit minor offenses in the city. I would achieve this goal by leveraging relationships with key stakeholders and outside funding.

2. If elected or re-elected to the city council, will you support a pre-booking diversion program for drug-related offenses and for those suffering from mental health issues?

P. BOND: DID NOT RESPOND

T. BOND:

Yes

The sooner we decriminalize marijuana the better. It’s important to also not criminalize those humans that have mental health issues. In turn, we should support and effectively treat not incarcerate those who are experiencing them.

BROWN: DID NOT RESPOND

CLEMONS:

Yes

As stated above, issues related to drug use are of the upmost priority to me if elected to the Memphis City Council. Duly, as a Memphis Police Officer, I know that their are other tactics that can be used aside from arresting a victim of drug abuse. If elected, I will work collaboratively with local, state and federal leadership to ensure that we get increased funding for Memphis’ Mental Health Institute as well as Regional One Health so that we can aggressively tackle the Mental Health epidemic that faces our community.

FORD: DID NOT RESPOND

HAMILTON:

Yes

Yes, I will propose or support a pre-booking diversion program. During my time in workforce development, I’ve implemented multiple diversion programs for drug-related offenses and for those suffering from mental health issues.

3. If elected or re-elected to the city council, will you support a policy to require transparency and democratic accountability before city agencies acquire new surveillance tools?

P. BOND: DID NOT RESPOND

T. BOND:

Yes

BROWN: DID NOT RESPOND

CLEMONS:

Yes

FORD: DID NOT RESPOND

HAMILTON:

Yes

4. If elected or re-elected to the city council will you work to make stop and arrest data, including race and ethnicity data, available to the public quarterly?

P. BOND: DID NOT RESPOND

T. BOND:

Yes

BROWN: DID NOT RESPOND

CLEMONS:

Yes

FORD: DID NOT RESPOND

HAMILTON:

Yes

5. If elected or re-elected to the city council what will you do to ensure a timely, transparent and independent investigation whenever an officer uses deadly force?

P. BOND: DID NOT RESPOND

T. BOND:

Continue to speak up as I have already done. Applying pressure to the top brass and mayor to encourage swift release of any footage and reports.

BROWN: DID NOT RESPOND

CLEMONS:

A Citizens Law Enforcement Review Board must happen to ensure a transparent government here in Memphis. Duly, we must work to help our community understand the role of police outside of these officer involved shooting situations. That means bringing back a more aggressive community policing standard in tandem with a CLERB. The ultimate goal is to build trust between police and citizens and vice versa.

FORD: DID NOT RESPOND

HAMILTON:

Include money in the budget to fund the Civilian law enforcement review board so that there is both a civilian lead investigation that happens concurrently to the Tennessee bureau of investigation. I would also work with the mayor to ensure that accountability is a integral part of the Memphis police department policies. This includes an MOU that mandates the police force share necessary information with CLERB to assist with police investigations.

6. Name 3 steps you would take as a council member to make the Community Law Enforcement Review Board (CLERB) more effective.

P. BOND: DID NOT RESPOND

T. BOND:

Working to establish subpoena power.
Maintaining an open line of communication between council, CLERB, the community and law enforcement.
Helping to find a resolve for the community in cases brought to CLERB.

BROWN: DID NOT RESPOND

CLEMONS:

1) Quarterly meetings between CLERB members, city officials, and members of the local faith community to discuss areas where we are lacking in transparency.

2) An online archive of non classified case materials for the sake of transparency.

3) A budget line item for a CLERK Liaison who will work to strengthen relationships between the CLERB and the MPD.

FORD: DID NOT RESPOND

HAMILTON:

Our focus will be on providing opportunities for ACE training, wrap-around services, and workforce development training and placement access. Also, we will be more intentional in leveraging relationships with key community stakeholders through collective impact and outside funding.

7. Would you support policies, programs or initiatives to dismantle the school-to-prison pipeline?

P. BOND: DID NOT RESPOND

T. BOND:

Yes

BROWN: DID NOT RESPOND

CLEMONS:

Yes

By putting more funding into ACES (Adverse Childhood Experiences) training for police and judicial personnel, we can hopefully come up with a countywide plan to divert youth away from the judicial system. Also, a citywide audit must be done to ensure that in no way is Memphis invested in the prison industrial complex; if Memphis is, we must divest.

FORD: DID NOT RESPOND

HAMILTON:

Yes

We must divest from police and jails/prisons. At this time, we must invest in infrastructure and services that support, strengthen and keeping our youth safe while giving them access to post-secondary opportunities. Study after study shows that a living wage, access to health services and treatment, educational opportunity and stable housing are more effective than police or jails.

8.What does criminal justice reform mean to you?

P. BOND: DID NOT RESPOND

T. BOND:

Righting the wrongs that have occurred as a result of the scales of justice being skewed and the decks being stacked against minority groups

BROWN: DID NOT RESPOND

CLEMONS:

Criminal Justice Reform for me means having an effective and cohesive relationship between police and those that we protect. Right now, there is so much of a “then against us,” mentality that it becomes very hard to serve those you are licensed to serve while also a having positive impact outside of your law enforcement duties. We must reestablish community partnerships and bonds between citizens and police to have criminal justice reform.

FORD: DID NOT RESPOND

HAMILTON:

The time is now to address the underlying issues of crime and incarceration. Through leadership development, youth intervention, criminal justice reform, and job creation we’ll eliminate mass incarceration.

2019-09-12T16:44:10-05:00 September 11th, 2019|Categories: General News|Tags: |