Memphis Council Candidate Questionnaire: Jerred Price’s Answers

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Jerred Price1. If elected or re-elected to the city council, will you propose programs and/or initiatives to limit the number of arrests for minor offenses in the city?

Price:

Yes

Far to often we see our jail cells full of people who have comitted non-violent offence; example: small possesstions of marijuana. Arrest such as these fill our jails and cost tax payers millions of dollars each year. We need to reform how we handle these small, non-violent offences that will cost tax payers less money and keep these offenders out of our jails. Our platform at www.jerredprice.com talks about criminal justice reform on this subject as well.

2. If elected or re-elected to the city council, will you support a pre-booking diversion program for drug-related offenses and for those suffering from mental health issues?

Price:

Yes

I think that most drug-related offences are often due to the mental health and well being of the indiviual. Mental heath and stability is a national crisis amongst drug users. Jail is not the way to correct this crisis. Investing in mental health and alternate paths for offenders is the cure/fix to many of these circumstances. I would like to work with our justice system, homeless shelters, and non-profits who help homless who are also drug users to get to the root cause of their drug addiction/use and turn their lives around by investing more city monies toward mental health and well-being.

3. If elected or re-elected to the city council, will you support a policy to require transparency and democratic accountability before city agencies acquire new surveillance tools?

Price:

Yes

4. If elected or re-elected to the city council will you work to make stop and arrest data, including race and ethnicity data, available to the public quarterly?

Price:

Yes

5.If elected or re-elected to the city council what will you do to ensure a timely, transparent and independent investigation whenever an officer uses deadly force?

Price:

As a council member, I would encourage my colegues to work closely with the department and ask for all approportiate evidence to support why this force was used. If data is “lost” or “inadequte”, hearings should be held with the department/mayor/council in partnership/assitance with TBI. When the loss of life is involved, we must ensure that it was an ABSOLUTE last resort and that the officer or others lives were in danger.

6. Name 3 steps you would take as a council member to make the Community Law Enforcement Review Board (CLERB) more effective.

Price:

1. As a council member, I would ask CLERB to meet once a month with the community development corportations/ in my district. I would connect the community with this board and share ideas, concerns, and thoughts. I would also ensure follow up with CLERB on items brought to the forefront by the citizens to ensure action is being taken. As of now, council members are not playing a large enough roll in being the voice and working with CLERB and the citizens they represent.
2. I would bring non-profits who work for justice reform and civil rights to the table to meet with CLERB to see how we can the non-profits missions/goals can be better implemented with the help and feedback of CLERB.
3. I would ensure that information provided to CLERB is accurate and without bias. I would ensure that any questions CLERB has regarding a concern are heard loud and clear.

7. Would you support policies, programs or initiatives to dismantle the school-to-prison pipeline?

Price:

Yes

Education and opportunity are key to keeping our children on a successful path in life. Not only do I ask for people’s support during this campaign, I also educate, meet, and learn about as many non-profits and their programs to help inform an assist those Im asking for support from – one must give back as much or more than they ask for. I want to be a resource for our community to help invidiuals who need help. By knowing about programs and non-profit, I can refer indiviuals to them and help ensure they have the assistance and guidance they desire or need. So many organizations are looking and yearning for outreach to those who need them most. I want to be the bridge between them.

8. What does criminal justice reform mean to you?

Price:

Criminal justice reform means ensuring we are doing all we can as a city for a fair & level justice system. As our city turns 200 years old this year, we need fresh new ideas and a new approach toward connecting the citizens we represent and the justice system that is suppose to protect and serve. Ensuring transparancy is a major item for me. But also, ensuring this system works better to help those trying to better themselves. Why do we make it so hard for someone to get back on their feet after they have served their time? America’s criminal justice system isn’t known for rehabilitation. But I think it should be and I want to work as hard as I can toward that goal.

2019-09-12T16:22:21-05:00 September 12th, 2019|Categories: General News|