Memphis Council Candidate Questionnaire: Martavius D. Jones’ Answers

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Martavius Jones1. If elected or re-elected to the city council, will you propose programs and/or initiatives to limit the number of arrests for minor offenses in the city?

Jones:

Yes

During my first term on the Memphis City Council, I co-sponsored a resolution to de-criminalize the possession of small amounts of marijuana, but the measure was preempted by the Tennessee General Assembly. That action should demonstrate my willingness to do so.

 

2. If elected or re-elected to the city council, will you support a pre-booking diversion program for drug-related offenses and for those suffering from mental health issues?

Jones:

Yes

Until I learn more about this, at first blush it would appear that state law would supersede measures in this area at the local level. However, I’m amenable to ideas that would deal with this matter.

3. If elected or re-elected to the city council, will you support a policy to require transparency and democratic accountability before city agencies acquire new surveillance tools?

Jones:

Yes

4. If elected or re-elected to the city council will you work to make stop and arrest data, including race and ethnicity data, available to the public quarterly?

Jones:

Yes

5. If elected or re-elected to the city council what will you do to ensure a timely, transparent and independent investigation whenever an officer uses deadly force?

Jones:

I have been in support of measures presented before that council to request an independent investigation when there is an office-involved shooting, whether or not there is a fatality.

6. Name 3 steps you would take as a council member to make the Community Law Enforcement Review Board (CLERB) more effective.

Jones:

Learn more about current shortcomings of CLERB from stakeholders.
Support reforms to make it more effective.
Exploring whether the role of an ombudsman would be in best practice.

7. Would you support policies, programs or initiatives to dismantle the school-to-prison pipeline?

Jones:

Yes

Support more diversionary programs for juveniles.
Would have to learn of current best practices in this area.

8. What does criminal justice reform mean to you?

Jones:

Reducing the incarcerations rates sentences for non-violent offenders.
More training while persons are incarcerated to give them the skills to function when they are released.

2019-09-12T16:37:43+00:00 September 12th, 2019|Categories: General News|